Monday, June 4, 2018

Hint of the Week

How to Re-Glaze a Piece (BigCeramicStore.com)

First, note that this process is never predictable. In most cases you can make a new piece in less time than you can spend re-glazing it, with much more predictable results. But sometimes there is that piece you can't part with and really want to re-glaze. Here are some things you can try to increase your success rate. The goal, of course, is to get the new glaze to stick to the old glaze.
·         Spray the piece with spray starch, let dry, and then re-glaze.
·         Spray the piece with sticky hairspray (usually the cheapest you can find), dry, re-glaze.
·         Heat the piece first, with a heat gun or in the oven or kiln.
o    Add glaze and then use hair dryer or heat gun to quickly dry the glaze to the piece.
·         Brush white (Elmer's) glue on, let dry, re-glaze.
·         Microwave the piece for 30 seconds. (Some potters say this makes a huge difference, and the piece doesn't need to actually get or stay hot)
·         To improve your odds further, wash the pot first with ammonia or detergent, wearing rubber gloves, and don't touch it. The oils from your fingers can prevent glaze from sticking.
And... Don't use too much of anything. If you get the coating too thick, you may prevent adhesion instead of encouraging it.

Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Crack Spackle



HINT OF THE WEEK: Super-Strong Slip For Attaching Wet To Dry Clay Pieces! Patching Cracks! Fixing Broken Greenware! And Even Joining Broken Bisqued Pieces! From the FlyeSchool.com

 

Paper Clay Slip or Magic Mud: For more extreme issues with patching or joining broken-off bone dry clay pieces or even bisque-fired pieces, or for just making sure those joins between leather hard slabs won't crack, a slip made of paper, clay, and magic water, or vinegar (à la Martha Grover) or various other mixtures might be just the thing. The paper fibers added to the mix help hold things together against drying stress, make it easy to re-wet and also fast-drying. THIS STUFF STINKS if it's left around long enough for the paper pulp to rot - it's best mixed up as needed.

Again using a recipe from Lana Wilson:
1/4 to 1/3 toilet paper by volume
2/3 to 3/4 broken up bone dry clay by volume

Put the clay and paper in a bucket and add magic water until the liquid level is an inch or so above the paper and clay. Let the bucket sit overnight, then drain off excess water and mix up with an immersion blender or regular blender. Use it at slip consistency for joining leather hard pieces, or dry it out to a putty for patching up cracks.

Re-Glazing



HINT OF THE WEEK: How to Re-Glaze a Piece

  copyright 2000, Cindi Anderson,  www.bigceramicstore.com

 

First, note that this process is never predictable. In most cases you can make a new piece in less time than you can spend re-glazing it, with much more predictable results. But sometimes there is that piece you can't part with and really want to re-glaze. Here are some things you can try to increase your success rate. The goal, of course, is to get the new glaze to stick to the old glaze.

·         Spray the piece with spray starch, let dry, then reglaze.
·         Spray the piece with sticky hairspray (usually the cheapest you can find), dry, reglaze.
·         Heat the piece first, with a heat gun, torch, in the oven or a kiln.
·         Brush white (Elmer's) glue on, let dry, reglaze.
·         Microwave the piece for 30 seconds. (Some potters say this makes a huge difference, and the piece doesn't need to actually get or stay hot)
·         Add some suspension agent to the glaze (CMC gum or Bentonite.)
·         Add some detergent / shampoo to the glaze (baby shampoo is good because it doesn't foam)
·         To improve your odds further, wash the pot first with ammonia or detergent, wearing rubber gloves, and don't touch it. The oils from your fingers can prevent glaze from sticking.
And... Don't use too much of anything. If you get the coating too thick, you may prevent adhesion instead of encouraging it.